West Wight People and Place

The West Wight People and Place project is taking shape. A few more portraits to take and then final preparation for the exhibition early next year.

Remember those old grainy black and white photographs of farm workers starring at the camera, their names, now long forgotten?

Well, the idea behind West Wight People and Place is to try and capture a more modern version of the community in the West Wight area. People who are, in some way, connected with the land, sea, community or heritage of this wind-swept corner of the Isle of Wight.

Its a moment in time.

Photography: Pete Johnstone

 

New sources of grant funding available

As we move into February grants and funding for community and environmental organisations is beginning to pick up and it is good to see some new funding coming on stream. In this months blog I have picked out several grants which will hopefully be of interest to you. If they are of help and you are successful in getting funding I would love to hear about it.

BBC Children in Need – Small Grants programme (UK)

Grants up to £10,000 are available for not for profit organisations per year for up to 3 years through the BBC Children in Need Small Grants programme. Funding is available for children and young people aged 18 and under who are experiencing disadvantage, any kind of disability, behavioural difficulties and /or living in poverty or deprivation.

Further details here

Deadline: 1st March 2017

Suez Communities Trust (Formerly the Sita Trust) (England and Scotland)

Landfill Communities Fund funding from this excellently run scheme for community facilities and wildlife projects. Grants of up to £20,000 are available through its Smaller Project Fund and up to £50,000 through the Primary Fund. As it is Landfill Community Funding, to be eligible, your project has to be near a SUEZ Recycling and Recovery waste processing site.

Further details here

Deadline: 24th April 2017

Try for Change Funding

In partnership with England rugby, Comic Relief is launching its first initiative through the Try for Change Fund on the 6th February 2017.

The Try for Change Fund is a small grants programme aimed at supporting smaller charities, community groups and local community rugby clubs in England. Organisations can apply for between £2,500 and £10,000 for up to 12 months.

Further details here

Grow Wild – grants for young people (UK)

Young people aged between 12 and 25 can apply for grants of up to £500 for projects that raise the awareness about the importance of UK native wild flowers and plants.

The funding is being made available through Grow Wild, the biggest ever wild flower campaign, bringing people together to transform local spaces with native wild flowers and plants. Other funding is also available.

Further details: here

Deadline 27th February 2017

Coastal Communities (UK)

Some positive funding news from the Government! The Government has announced that the Coastal Communities Fund, a UK-wide programme designed to support the economic development of coastal communities is to be extended by four years and that a further 28 teams are to be set up.

Each team – made up of local volunteers, councils and local businesses will receive an initial £10,000 each to develop a blueprint for economic growth and be offered support from a network geared towards regenerating seaside areas.

Further details: here

Deadline date unclear.

British Ecological Society Outreach Grants

Through the BES Outreach programme, individuals, and not for profit organisations can apply for grants to promote ecological science to a wide audience. The funding is available for projects that increase understanding of, and engagement with ecology.

Maximum award is £2,000

Further details: here

Deadline: 22nd March 2017

Grow the Game

The Football Foundation’s Grow the game Fund grant scheme will reopen on the 1st February 2017.

The aim of the fund is to increase participation in football by bth players and volunteers. Organisations are able to receive £1,500 per new team created over two to three years with financial support being reduced in the second and third year of the project.

Deadline: 29th March 2017

Further details: here

Other grants available.

On the sport side – worth investigating some interesting new grants from Sport England. On the community side the Big Lottery Fund’s Reaching Communities programme is going from strength to strength and has just announced £18. 5 million for community projects in England. I also expect we will soon hear who has been successful in the Great Place Scheme. This new pilot scheme is funded by the HLF, Arts Council and Historic England  with the aim of putting arts, culture and heritage in the heart of communities – this is the sort of grants scheme I really like – a good amount of money and one that works across traditional sector boundaries.

Crowdfunding

It is pleasing to see more and more organisations are trying their hand at crowdfunding to raise much needed cash for community and environmental projects. This is good news but many of the groups fail to use the tried and tested techniques that help them maximise their chance of reaching their target. The Crowdfunding Nature project we did last year was pulled together by an evaluation video – Tips for Success in running a crowdfunding campaign. It can be seen here.

PJ.elements can help with scoping funds for community and environmental projects – if you would like to see how we can help please contact me via the contact page.

All the best

Pete

Feature Picture: My January travels around the Isle of Wight.

 

 

Help save the Pluto Pavillion, a WW2 remnant of the D-Day landings on the Isle of Wight

It’s good to see crowdfunding being put to good use help safeguard a unique World War 2 structure at Yaverland near Sandown on the east coast of the Isle of Wight.

Ian Boyd of the Arc consultancy showed me around the old Pavilion which is one of the last known intact structures of the PLUTO project – the Pipeline Under The Ocean that supplied essential fuel to support the D-Day landings and the Allied invasion from June 1944.

The Pavilion housed the generators (and still does) which powered the 16 Sandown pumps and delivered thousands of tonnes of fuel under the English Channel to France, a vital part of the whole operation but now in urgent need of repair.

A crowdfunding campaign has been set up to raise £5000 to help stabilise the walls – once the building is restored to the original design the plan will be to ensure this amazing story can be fully told.

JustGiving Crowdfunding page

Image from the Justgiving Crowdfunding page

To help save the pavilion go to the Just giving page: https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/PLUTO

Thank you for your support.

Pete Johnstone

 

Goodbye East Anglia!

After 23 glorious years living in East Anglia we are heading south. We will be leaving behind some wonderful friends and a rich and varied landscape full of colour and interest. When I joined the Cambridge office of the Countryside Commission in 1993 someone said to me the landscape was flat and boring – how wrong could they be. It is a fantastic place and I will be sad to go.

Now it is time to try somewhere new and we are heading to the Isle of Wight to find new landscapes and to meet new friends. As we make the move PJ.elements will be taking a break for a while and will hopefully re -surface again in September with a new home and camera in hand!

With best wishes,

Pete Johnstone

Crowdfunding Nature – evaluation video on recent work to test the effectiveness of crowdfunding for wildlife organisations in the East of England

Crowdfunding Nature – Project Update (June 2016)

Keep the Nightingales Singing!

Project update: As part of the Crowdfunding for Nature project, Natural England and local charity Nene Coppicing and Crafts raised £5200 from 90 backers from the UK crowdfunding platform Crowdfunder.
Crowdfunding Nature is an initiative run by the East of England Biodiversity Forum and managed by PJ.elements and CrowfundUK. The initiative is currently undergoing evaluation and a short video of the lessons learned to help other environmental organisations with crowdfunding campaigns will be out soon.

Elements of the Landscape

Now at the start of April, Elements in the Landscape is just beginning to take shape with lots of phone calls resulting in some more people allowing me to take their photograph. My project is very much about the people in the landscape and their connection to it as it is about the landscape itself.

Jenny Furong, Chatteris Museum

Jenny Furlong, Chatteris Museum

Jenny Furlong is the volunteer Curator of Chatteris Museum, a post she has held for 15 years and now shares with Ian Mason. The Museum moved to the present location in Chatteris in 1995.

One of the exhibits in the Museum is on Cornelius Vermuyden who in the 1650s commissioned by the Crown, directed major projects to drain the Fens and who constructed a system of ‘washes’, to allow periodic flooding of the area by water.

 

Paul Fox and Peter Gardiner, Welney

Paul Fox and Peter Gardiner, Welney

Welney Residents Users Group is a community action group that was formed in 2014 and established as a charity in March 2015. In April 2015 RUG took over the lease of Sandgate Corner – a large overgrown field in the north of the village. Welney RUG are in the process of turning the area into a community greenspace and wildlife area, with orchard, sensory garden and play area.

Peter Gardiner pruning in the orchard

Peter Gardiner pruning in the orchard.

Peter Gardiner a resident of Welney for almost 17 years and a member of RUG has recently retired and has spent some of his spare time helping with the selection, planning and planting of the orchard and native trees.

The young fruit trees will require yearly pruning and with this in mind Peter and another resident recently attended a pruning course with the East of England Apples and Orchards Project to learn the necessary skills required to maintain the new fruit trees.

 

Fred Ingrams painting in the fens

Fred Ingrams painting in the fens.

The fens have changed my life said Fred, an artist who has a passion for painting the fens landscape. I will be painting a scene when a farmer will come up to me and tell me some amazing stories, there is a certain quality about the fen people and landscape which is unique and not to be found anywhere else.

PJ.elements have been awarded a small grant by the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership Scheme to deliver Elements of the Landscape, a project to photograph people living and working in the Ouse Washes landscape and document their story through images. The people captured in the portraits will have a connection to the land or water, farming, biodiversity crafts or community life.

The Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership Scheme is a 3-year project largely funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The scheme focuses on the promotion of the area surrounding the Ouse Washes, the heart of the Cambridgeshire and Norfolk Fens, and on encouraging community engagement with the area’s diverse heritage.

The wildlife property developer of the fens

At first glance the Fens landscape surrounding the Ouse Washes does not feel like a place that is rich in wildlife, indeed it is has a strong farming heritage and is well known in the UK for growing salad crops, root vegetables and wheat in the low lying fertile soils. However, I was to learn something different as I was to meet Cliff Carson the Environmental Officer for the Middle Level Commissioners, the organisation that manages the flood defence and water levels in the Ouse Washes area and beyond.

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The Middle Level Commissioners.

As I drove down a narrow fen road to meet Cliff I passed by several half – built and now derelict bungalows which for some untold reason had been abandoned by the owners before they were completed and they looked a real mess and blot on the landscape. I met up with Cliff and we drove off in his truck to survey work he has done over the last five years for the Middle Level Internal Drainage Board Biodiversity Action Plan. Essentially wildlife improvements for the most threatened plants and animals that require some conservation help along the way, both to increase their numbers and the places where they live.

Over the length of the day we visited pumping stations to inspect on bat boxes and barn owl boxes that Cliff had constructed over the last five years. In fact, 92 barn owl boxes to be exact, erected in barns and on the sides of pumping stations – these boxes are well used and are really important for the breeding success of the owls as there is precious little natural nesting sites for the birds.

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Inspecting a barn owl box on the side of a pumping station.

The reason for meeting Cliff was as part of my Elements in the Landscape project to photograph people who live and work in the Ouse Washes landscape and who have some connection with it – and Cliff certainly fitted my criteria as he spent over 30 years with the RSPB at the Ouse Washes reserve and more recently 10 years with the Middle Level Commissioners.

Under a road bridge Cliff showed me the difference between otter spraints and mink scats, with the former apparently having a strong musky smell, not that I noticed that much on the cold February morning! It is good to know the otter is holding its own in the area, although some are being found drowned in the illegal eel nets as eel numbers begin to increase.   Cliff has helped the otter population too with constructing over 70 otter holts along the banks of the drains with the help of funding from Landfill Community Fund grants.

 

 

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Clearing out kingfisher holes in the metal revetment.

The Kingfisher is another species that has had a helping hand – here Cliff has bored over 150 holes at over 80 locations in the metal revetments to create artificial nest sites and during our trip around the Washes Cliff got busy deepening the holes to get the right angle so that the Kingfishers can fly up from just above the water into the nest.

Our day finished, we drove back and Cliff joked that he is sometimes referred to as the wildlife property developer of the fens as so much of his time is spent constructing homes for wildlife.  It is more than likely that much of his wildlife home making will last for decades and will a great legacy for wildlife, which is more than can be said for the property developer of the decaying bungalows I passed on my way home.

Pete Johnstone.

 

 

 

 

PJ.elements have been awarded a small grant by the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership Scheme to deliver Elements of the Landscape, a project to photograph people living and working in the Ouse Washes landscape and document their story through images. The people captured in the portraits will have a connection to the land or water, farming, biodiversity crafts or community life.

The Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership Scheme is a 3-year project largely funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The scheme focuses on the promotion of the area surrounding the Ouse Washes, the heart of the Cambridgeshire and Norfolk Fens, and on encouraging community engagement with the area’s diverse heritage.

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Little egrets and whooper swans in the distance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crowdfunding Nature: Love a Duck campaign!

Duck End is a much loved nature reserve on the edge of Maulden in Bedfordshire. It has ponds, marshy areas, pollards and a wildflower meadow and home for lots of wildlife. The reserve is also the last remnant of Maulden Moor, where peat was cut for fuel in the 18th century, so it has wildlife and some history but walking around the reserve, especially in winter, is getting increasingly difficult as it can be a very wet place.

The Greensand Trust who manage the reserve want to replace the old boardwalk with a new one and will be running a crowdfunding campaign, called Love a Duck!  to help raise funds for the new boardwalk.

Crowdfunding will be used to replace the old boardwalk

Crowdfunding will be used to replace the old boardwalk.

I met Jon Balaam from the Greensand Trust on the day of filming the crowdfunding video who explained that the volunteers have really enjoyed preparing for the video and the crowdfunding idea and that the Trust hopes to be launching the campaign next week.

The crowdfunding video

The crowdfunding video

The Greensand Trust is one of a number conservation organisations who are taking part in Crowdfunding Nature a pilot project run by the East of England Biodiversity Forum to test the potential for crowdfunding to raise funds and profile for nature based projects.

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Watch out for the Love a Duck crowdfunding campaign coming soon!

Photo: Pete Johnstone

 

 

Crowdfunding Nature with Froglife

Project Update. Froglife’s campaign is now live – please support it if you can: http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/hoppy-families

 

At last the vision of Crowdfunding Nature is beginning to take shape. I spent a lovely morning with Cat Duerden from Froglife at their Boardwalks Local Nature Reserve in Peterborough as they filmed their pitch for their first venture into crowdfunding.

Cat explained: Froglife are planning to launch our exciting new crowdfunding campaign in early February to raise £3500 to create a ‘Hoppy Families’ Nature Trail. As part the campaign we want to encourage more people to visit the Boardwalks as although the reserve is free and easily accessible and close to the city centre, few people seem to know about this beautiful greenspace.

Getting the filming script right

Getting the filming script right.

Crowdfunding Nature is a pilot project being run by the East of England Biodiversity Forum with Natural England to test the effectiveness of crowdfunding to help raise the profile and funding for nature based activities in the East of England. Close behind Froglife are 6 other environmental groups working up their own crowdfunding project to be launched in the coming months.

The Crowdfunding Nature project initiated by PJ.elements with the help of CrowdfundUK is providing training and ongoing support for the environmental groups involved in the project.

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The Boardwalks Local Nature Reserve, Peterborough.

Crowdfunding has proved itself as an effective way of doing commerce in the business world yet I believe their are real opportunities for nature to benefit as well. We just need to get the right mix of people and projects together and inspire public to get involved. I am looking forward to the Froglife crowdfunding campaign coming out and seeing the video too – it is going to be fun!

I will be sure to blog the crowdfunding campaigns on this website and on Twitter as they go live – all help in promoting the campaigns once launched we be gratefully appreciated.

Pete Johnstone

PJ.elements

Photos: ©Pete Johnstone.

Main picture: Katie with video, Cat Duerden centre and Richard with Lionel the Frog.