New sources of grant funding available

As we move into February grants and funding for community and environmental organisations is beginning to pick up and it is good to see some new funding coming on stream. In this months blog I have picked out several grants which will hopefully be of interest to you. If they are of help and you are successful in getting funding I would love to hear about it.

BBC Children in Need – Small Grants programme (UK)

Grants up to £10,000 are available for not for profit organisations per year for up to 3 years through the BBC Children in Need Small Grants programme. Funding is available for children and young people aged 18 and under who are experiencing disadvantage, any kind of disability, behavioural difficulties and /or living in poverty or deprivation.

Further details here

Deadline: 1st March 2017

Suez Communities Trust (Formerly the Sita Trust) (England and Scotland)

Landfill Communities Fund funding from this excellently run scheme for community facilities and wildlife projects. Grants of up to £20,000 are available through its Smaller Project Fund and up to £50,000 through the Primary Fund. As it is Landfill Community Funding, to be eligible, your project has to be near a SUEZ Recycling and Recovery waste processing site.

Further details here

Deadline: 24th April 2017

Try for Change Funding

In partnership with England rugby, Comic Relief is launching its first initiative through the Try for Change Fund on the 6th February 2017.

The Try for Change Fund is a small grants programme aimed at supporting smaller charities, community groups and local community rugby clubs in England. Organisations can apply for between £2,500 and £10,000 for up to 12 months.

Further details here

Grow Wild – grants for young people (UK)

Young people aged between 12 and 25 can apply for grants of up to £500 for projects that raise the awareness about the importance of UK native wild flowers and plants.

The funding is being made available through Grow Wild, the biggest ever wild flower campaign, bringing people together to transform local spaces with native wild flowers and plants. Other funding is also available.

Further details: here

Deadline 27th February 2017

Coastal Communities (UK)

Some positive funding news from the Government! The Government has announced that the Coastal Communities Fund, a UK-wide programme designed to support the economic development of coastal communities is to be extended by four years and that a further 28 teams are to be set up.

Each team – made up of local volunteers, councils and local businesses will receive an initial £10,000 each to develop a blueprint for economic growth and be offered support from a network geared towards regenerating seaside areas.

Further details: here

Deadline date unclear.

British Ecological Society Outreach Grants

Through the BES Outreach programme, individuals, and not for profit organisations can apply for grants to promote ecological science to a wide audience. The funding is available for projects that increase understanding of, and engagement with ecology.

Maximum award is £2,000

Further details: here

Deadline: 22nd March 2017

Grow the Game

The Football Foundation’s Grow the game Fund grant scheme will reopen on the 1st February 2017.

The aim of the fund is to increase participation in football by bth players and volunteers. Organisations are able to receive £1,500 per new team created over two to three years with financial support being reduced in the second and third year of the project.

Deadline: 29th March 2017

Further details: here

Other grants available.

On the sport side – worth investigating some interesting new grants from Sport England. On the community side the Big Lottery Fund’s Reaching Communities programme is going from strength to strength and has just announced £18. 5 million for community projects in England. I also expect we will soon hear who has been successful in the Great Place Scheme. This new pilot scheme is funded by the HLF, Arts Council and Historic England  with the aim of putting arts, culture and heritage in the heart of communities – this is the sort of grants scheme I really like – a good amount of money and one that works across traditional sector boundaries.

Crowdfunding

It is pleasing to see more and more organisations are trying their hand at crowdfunding to raise much needed cash for community and environmental projects. This is good news but many of the groups fail to use the tried and tested techniques that help them maximise their chance of reaching their target. The Crowdfunding Nature project we did last year was pulled together by an evaluation video – Tips for Success in running a crowdfunding campaign. It can be seen here.

PJ.elements can help with scoping funds for community and environmental projects – if you would like to see how we can help please contact me via the contact page.

All the best

Pete

Feature Picture: My January travels around the Isle of Wight.

 

 

New crowdfunding initiatives and support for community pubs

Funding update.

Crowdfunding is a tried and tested way of raising money via the internet for a project or cause that requires financial support. Originally crowdfunding was a way that entrepreneurs could raise funding to get a new business venture off the ground, but as crowdfunding is becoming more popular, community and environmental groups are using it as a practical way of raising funds for social projects that benefit people and/or the local environment such as play areas and nature reserves.

As crowdfunding becomes more widely known bigger companies and financial institutions are now taking an interest and I highlight three new initiatives below, one from a supermarket giant and two from high street banks. If you are thinking of raising funds for a project via crowdfunding and one of the initiatives below meets your criteria then it is well worth considering putting your project through that crowdfunding platform, however, there is of course no certainty of receiving any funding from these companies so if you do apply and get support then treat it as a bonus.

My other funding news item this month is around support for communities wanting to take on running a local pub. Having recently moved to the Isle of Wight I have seen the sad closure of several village pubs. Pub closure has a real impact on the local communities, particularly if there is no other pub in the vicinity. So, this support offered by the Plunkett Foundation with funding from the Government and a new charity supporting community business is to be welcomed.

Tesco Backit

Small food and drinks businesses have the chance to show off their products and campaign for funding through Backit – a Tesco and Seedrs run crowdfunding platform.

Tesco will review the campaigns and will provide advice and mentoring from industry experts. There is a £2000 minimum target with no maximum. The costs to the business are 1.4% (=20p) payment processing from Stripe the payment provider.

The offer is open to all UK businesses and might be useful for small Isle of Wight businesses who are developing their local produce ideas. Details and further information can be found here.

Life skills on Spacehive

Barclays is using Spacehive and crowdfunding to encourage young people running crowdfunding campaigns that develop their skills. If you are 16 – 24, they could pledge up to half of your funding target up to a total of £500. The idea of the fund is to develop skills such as marketing, creating videos, pitching to businesses as well as improving your local area.

Crowdfunder

And mentioned in a previous blog, Santander through their Changemaker Fund is putting up to £200,000 to support social enterprises, community groups and small charities in the UK that help disadvantaged people in local communities.

More than a Pub

The Community Pub Business Support programme is a unique two-year programme established to help support community ownership of pubs in England. The programme has a value of 33.62 million and is jointly funded by Department of Communities Local Government and Power to Change.

The programme is being led by the Plunkett Foundation and is well worth investigating if your community has lost or about to lose your pub.

As always please let me know how you get on if you do apply for any of these funds.

Photo Credit: Pete’s November travels on the Isle of Wight.

© Pete Johnstone.

 

A Great Place

October has been spent meeting some interesting people – perhaps you may know some of them from my mosaic – and in visiting places around the island to get to know my new home.  I am learning a lot of what the Island has got to offer and what it has not.

Finding the funds to do valuable work is a common theme when talking to people be it on church or parish projects, landscape improvements or those working on regeneration projects such as the Pluto Project in Sandown, mentioned in my last blog.  It is good to know that crowdfunding is being talked about with enthusiasm and hopefully my crowdfunding video – tips for success will be of help to those who have yet to venture into this form of fundraising.

I was really chuffed that On the Wight chose one of my photos, Abstract Sands to be their photo of the week – particularly pleasing for me as most of my photography tends to be of people rather of landscapes.

The two best venues I have been to this month are the Piano Cafe in Freshwater which serves excellent coffee and the Neil Williams Gallery in Ventnor whose landscape photography is truly stunning. The Island is certainly a great place and I look forward to seeing more of it and meeting new people in the months to come.

Help save the Pluto Pavillion, a WW2 remnant of the D-Day landings on the Isle of Wight

It’s good to see crowdfunding being put to good use help safeguard a unique World War 2 structure at Yaverland near Sandown on the east coast of the Isle of Wight.

Ian Boyd of the Arc consultancy showed me around the old Pavilion which is one of the last known intact structures of the PLUTO project – the Pipeline Under The Ocean that supplied essential fuel to support the D-Day landings and the Allied invasion from June 1944.

The Pavilion housed the generators (and still does) which powered the 16 Sandown pumps and delivered thousands of tonnes of fuel under the English Channel to France, a vital part of the whole operation but now in urgent need of repair.

A crowdfunding campaign has been set up to raise £5000 to help stabilise the walls – once the building is restored to the original design the plan will be to ensure this amazing story can be fully told.

JustGiving Crowdfunding page

Image from the Justgiving Crowdfunding page

To help save the pavilion go to the Just giving page: https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/PLUTO

Thank you for your support.

Pete Johnstone

 

Crowdfunding Nature – Project Update (June 2016)

Keep the Nightingales Singing!

Project update: As part of the Crowdfunding for Nature project, Natural England and local charity Nene Coppicing and Crafts raised £5200 from 90 backers from the UK crowdfunding platform Crowdfunder.
Crowdfunding Nature is an initiative run by the East of England Biodiversity Forum and managed by PJ.elements and CrowfundUK. The initiative is currently undergoing evaluation and a short video of the lessons learned to help other environmental organisations with crowdfunding campaigns will be out soon.

PJ.elements awarded Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership Community Heritage grant.

PJ.elements has been awarded a Community Heritage grant from the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership to photograph people living and working in the landscape of the Cambridgeshire and Norfolk fens.

Pete Johnstone the owner of PJ.elements said:

This is a great opportunity and I’m looking forward to being able to meet and photograph some of the people who live and work in the area and to try and tell their story. I am aiming to photograph farmers, people who are responsible for the water management of the Ouse Washes and those involved with local crafts in the area.

Mark Nokkert, project manager for the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership scheme said:

In awarding the grant we like the fact that Elements of the Landscape  will leave a photographic record of people living and working in the Ouse Washes.  We look increasingly to use images of the 1947 floods and earlier ones showing life and people living in past times, and so we  think that this project will  add an important  landscape-specific  contribution to an image library of  fenland life today. 

Pictured are Sara Marshall and Mark Nokkert of the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership team.

Photo by Pete Johnstone.

The Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership scheme (OWLP) is a 3-year project largely funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The scheme focuses on the promotion of the area surrounding the Ouse Washes, the heart of the Cambridgeshire and Norfolk Fens, and on encouraging community engagement with the area’s diverse heritage.

 

OuseWashes-logo-website-RGB HLFNL_2747

Pop up consultations on the Secrets of the Sands

PJ.elements joined forces with Resources for Change to undertake community consultations in the ‘Secrets of the Sands’ landscape area and nearby Bedford and Milton Keynes to discover how much people know about the Bedfordshire Greensand Ridge.

 

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Consultation in Flitwick, Central Beds. Photo: Pete Johnstone

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An avenue of parkland trees on the Greensand Ridge. Photo: Pete Johnstone

The Research is part of our work with the Interpretation consultancy TellTale and the Secrets of the Sands Landscape Partnership Scheme funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The results of our work will feed into the Interpretation and Audience Development Plan for the Project’s stage two Heritage Lottery Fund application. More information on the Secrets of the Sands Landscape Partnership Scheme can be found here

‘Secrets of the Sands’ is the landscape partnership scheme for the a long narrow wooded sandstone ridge running 35 miles south west to north east from Leighton Buzzard to Gamlingay to the south of Bedford. It is a fascinating area of woodlands, heathland and many old parkland estates with their ancient trees. Certainly a hidden landscape and one worth exploring!

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Rowney Warren, a Forestry Commission Woodland not far from Shefford. Photo: Pete Johnstone

 

Images © Pete Johnstone

The Prince’s Countryside Fund – Autumn round opens (UK)

The Prince’s Countryside Fund wants to have a positive long a long term effect on rural communities by helping people who live and work in the countryside tackle and resolve key rural issues.The Fund can provide grants towards three priority areas:

  • Thriving Rural Communities
  • Rural Livehoods
  • Farmers for the Future

This is a good grant scheme, particularly aimed at the countryside as opposed to may grant schemes that focus on urban issues. The Fund its self is funded by donations from events and companies such as clothing company Barbour and  food giant Country Life who have an interest in the well-being of the countryside.

As always if you would like help with developing an application please get in touch.

The grant application opens on the 7th September and close on the 8th October 2015

Details: The Prince’s Countryside Fund

Photo: Pete Johnstone

Coastal Revival Fund (England)

The Government is inviting bids for a £3 million Coastal Revival Fund (CRF) which is funding to be Spent in 2015/16.

The CRF will support projects to help revive heritage assets that are important to local communities but not yet reached their full potential or are facing neglect. Grants will support communities looking to unlock the economic potential of those hard to tackle buildings,landscapes, facilities and amusements and sustain them in the long term.

Always please contact me if you require any help with the application.

Details: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coastal-revival-fund-bidding-prospectus-and-application-form

Closing date: 14th September 2015.

Photo  © Pete Johnstone

Urban regeneration in New York

The High Line, New York

The High Line, New York showing viewing platform

I had a great opportunity to visit the High Line in New York recently to meet some staff and volunteers who gave an excellent tour of this city regeneration initiative.

Built in the late 1920s as a freight only line the ‘High Line’ in New York served many factories and warehouses and was raised above ground to reduce congestion, improve safety and increase efficiency.

By 1980 the last train ran along the tracks and for the next decade or so the High Line became derelict and a no go area. It was only with the threat of demolition in  the 1990s that local people and city organisations came together to work out a future for the line.

And what a great example of urban regeneration it has been! I was particularly impressed with how well it is managed with a combination of the Friends of the High Line volunteers and staff and the city parks dept among others. Plus how the old architecture fits in with the modern new build of offices and homes. Now a tourist attraction in its own right the next section to be opened, with views of the Hudson River, will have minimal management where visitors  will be able to walk along a path through self-sown vegetation to contrast that of the more managed southern section.

The High Line

The High Line’s unique planting set against new build.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The High Line is well worth a visit when next in New York and hopefully inspiration for UK projects in Liverpool and London who have used Spacehive to help crowdfund and promote their work

More High Line images can be viewed here.